Centre Culturel Irlandais

Portal of collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Home

Home

Select language

Address

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

You will need to present a pass sanitaire

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

You will need to present a pass sanitaire

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: Spectres of Fiction : New Political Contexts for The Playboy of the Western World (2020)
Authors: Eva URBAN, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 45 n 1 Printemps-été 2020)
Article on page: p. 103-117
Languages: English
Descriptors:

DUBLIN

ESSAY

NORTHERN IRELAND

THEATRE

Abstract: The 2019 Lyric Theatre and Dublin Theatre Festival co-production of J. M. Synge’s The Playboy of the Western World (1907), directed by Oonagh Murphy, encouraged an abstract reading of the play in new political contexts. Set in the 1980s at the Derry / Donegal border and performed in Northern Irish accents, it was haunted by references to the area’s history of deprivation, powerlessness, the violence and victims of the conflict, the Disappeared, the communal trauma, and the current threat posed by Brexit. This essay explores how Murphy’s production highlighted spectres of fiction in the play, haunted not only by historical dramaturgical traditions and by the ghosts of the Northern Irish conflict but also by the ghosts of ancient wandering Irish bards. It offers a contemporary approach that situates the play’s preoccupation with fiction within an international context of the “social realities” of populist propaganda.
Publishing country : France
Collection : Médiathèque