Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Paul Lynch’s Grace and the “Postmemory” of the Famine (2020)
Auteurs : Sylvie MIKOWSKI, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 45 n 2 Automne-hiver 2020)
Article en page(s) : p. 149-162
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

ESSAI

IRLANDE

LITTERATURE

Résumé :

This paper starts as a discussion of Paul Lynch’s novel Grace as a Famine novel and on the ways in which the Famine is represented historically, but also emotionally. It questions the limits of language and fiction in representing history, trauma and affects and discusses the specificity of Grace, comparing it with Liam O’Flaherty’s Famine and Joseph O’Connor’s Star of the Sea. Grace, it is argued, manages to evade the nationalist versus revisionist debate and constitutes, at an aesthetic level, the same type of middle-ground as the one achieved by the “post-revisionist” historians, situated half-way between the mythologising of the first interpreters of the Famine and the revisionists’ controversial attempts at writing “value-free” narratives of the tragedy. Drawing on Eric L. Berlatksy’s model of an anti-realist narrative mode and its application in Art Spiegelman’s Maus, and on Marianne Hirsch’s concept of postmemory applied to the Shoah, the essay posits that Lynch’s novel offers the reader a renewed mode of understanding the reality of the past, and in particular, of horrifying historical events that resist representation – in this case, the Great Famine.
Pays de publication : France
Fonds : Médiathèque