Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : “Flowers of Fire” : Sociopolitical Issues in U2’s War and The Joshua Tree (2020)
Auteurs : Muiño CANIDO, Elena, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 45 n 2 Automne-hiver 2020)
Article en page(s) : p. 55-75
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

ESSAI

MUSIQUE

POLITIQUE

SOCIETE

SOCIOLOGIE

Résumé : U2 have always managed to hold a narrow line between social awareness and partisan political allegiance, belonging to a broad category of music that Rachel E. Seiler calls “contemporary conscious popular music”, which includes “music of any genre that focuses on social issues and perceived problems in society and may or may not include music that carries an overtly political message”. Consequently, much of the analysis of their songs claim that these are only a mere description of the terrible situation countries such as Ireland and the US were facing at that time. In this paper, however, I will examine the sociopolitical significance of U2’s songs as an appreciator of their cultural contribution and show that the events which formed the backdrop to some of U2’s most explicitly political songs in the 1980s – especially those included in War and The Joshua Tree – are etched indelibly into the text of both Ireland’s and America’s troubled colonial and political history. Ultimately, the lyrics analysed will also provide a good way of exploring how rock music, identity and sociopolitical ideas combine.
Pays de publication : France
Fonds : Médiathèque