Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

You will need to present a pass sanitaire

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

You will need to present a pass sanitaire

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: ‘It was then I knew life’: Political Critique and Moral Debate in Teresa Deevy’s Temporal Powers(1932) (2020)
Authors: Caoilfhionn NI BHEACHAIN, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Irish University Review (Vol 50 n 2 Autumn/Winter 2020)
Article on page: p. 337-355
Languages: English
Descriptors:

CRITICISM

INDEPENDENCE

LITERATURE

THEATRE

Abstract: This article argues that Teresa Deevy’s early plays for the Abbey Theatre deliberately intervened in the cultural politics of the Irish Free State. While the focus here is on Temporal Powers(1932), Deevy’s first twoAbbey productions, The Reapers(1930) and A Disciple(1931), are also considered. Taken together, this article demonstrates how these plays present a striking critique of the new state under the Cumann nanGaedhael administration. Set in 1927, during the Land Annuities crisis,Temporal Powers meditates on the relationship of poor tenant labourers to the land and society they inhabit. In it, Deevy explores themes such as eviction, homelessness, emigration, justice, religion,grief, and poverty. This article introduces this little-known play,contextualises it, and discusses her treatment of key themes through an examination of characters, Shavian influences, dramatic structure and form.
Publishing country : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Collection : Médiathèque