Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Disability, Identity, and Early Twentieth-Century Irish Drama (2020)
Auteurs : Emma CREEDON, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 50 n 1 Special Issue Spring/Summer 2020)
Article en page(s) : p. 55-66
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

SANTE

Résumé : This essay assesses the role of physical disability in early twentieth-century Irish dramatic literature. In particular, by focusing on such playsas W.B. Yeats’s On Baile’s Strand(1903) and the character of Johnny Boyle in Sean O’Casey’s Juno and the Paycock(1924), it critiques the tradition of identifying characters with disabilities solely by their physical impairment and exploiting disability as metaphor; physical disability has been historically employed as a synecdoche for a thwarted morality,or blindness as an allegory for prophecy. However, scholarly criticisms of the Social Model of Disability have demonstrated how disability can be reappropriated to reconceptualize notions of bodily normalcy.Furthermore, this essay suggests that the convention of “cripping up”,an industry term describing the practice of an able-bodied actor playing a character with a physical disability, contributes to the marginalization of those with physical disability in Irish culture. The result is the potential degradation of the disabled body, a stylized performance evoking vaudevillian conventions; performance thus engenders belief in stereotype.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Fonds : Médiathèque