Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : 'Be ye wise as serpents and innocent as doves': George Berkeley on Toleration and Conversion in the Irish context of the 1730s (2019)
Auteurs : Marta SZYMANSKA-LEWOSZEWSKA, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Eighteenth-Century Ireland (vol. 34 2019)
Article en page(s) : p. 66-84
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

HISTOIRE

PHILOSOPHIE

RELIGION

XVIIIE SIECLE

Résumé : This paper considers George Berkeley's (1685-1753) exclusive and limited conception of toleration for Catholics in the 1730s and how his views fit with those of other advocates of toleration in Ireland at the time by looking at sermons preached by Edward Synge (1690-1762) the younger and John Abernethy (1680-1740). In his early years of service as a bishop of Cloyne, Berkeley drew a distinction between what he called 'mere Papits' and 'Recusants' and proposed that political toleration only be extended to the former. This corresponded with the idea of freedom of conscience suggested by both Synge (in 1725) and abernethy (in 1735). Due to their obedience to the Pope in Rome, Berkeley thought that Recusants posed a threat to Haniverian power in Ireland - at least up to the year of 1745. At the same time, like Synge and Abernethy, 'the tolerant Berkeley' argued that Catholics should be persuaded, rather than forced, to convert to the true religion. This was in keeping with his life's mission of bringing man closer to God.
Pays de publication : Irlande
Fonds : Médiathèque