Centre Culturel Irlandais



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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Tuam Babies and Kerry Babies : Clandestine Pregnancies and Child Burial Sites in Tom Murphy's Drama and Mary Leland's The Killeen (2019)
Auteurs : Mary BURKE, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 49 n 2 Autumn/Winter 2019)
Article en page(s) : p. 245-261
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

LITTERATURE

ESSAI

CULTURE

FEMMES

Résumé : This article focuses on strictures pertaining to reproduction and childbirth in Tom Murphy's "On the Outside" (1959), "On the Inside" (1974), and "Bailegangaire" (1985), and Mary Leland's "The Killeen" (1985), and the relevance of such to clandestine child burials. Murphy was born in Tuam in 1935 in the vicinity of St. Mary's religious-run institution for unmarried mothers (1925–61) – on the site of which the unregistered remains of numerous infants were recently uncovered – and emigrated in 1962, a near overlap with St. Mary's years of operation. The research that uncovered its mass grave was spurred by an inaccurate local memory of the site as a ‘lisheen’/‘killeen’, or unconsecrated burial site for stillborns. This folk response to Catholic doctrine, that the unbaptized could not be buried in consecrated ground, was practiced into the 1950s in alternative ‘sacred’ sites. The lisheen circumvented the doctrinal rigidities that produced Tuam's carceral infrastructure and its mass grave, but metropolitan unfamiliarity with this poorly-documented custom may have factored in the false accusation that led to 1984's ‘Kerry Babies’ trial. Alertness to such contexts make audible previously muted references within Murphy's oeuvre to the hidden histories of vulnerable women's bodies and those of their secretly birthed, concealed, miscarried, or stillborn babies.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Lieu de publication : Edimbourg
Fonds : Médiathèque
En ligne : https://www.euppublishing.com/doi/full/10.3366/iur.2019.0404