Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : A dance for all the outcasts : Class and Postcolonialism in Brendan Behan's An Giall and The Hostage (2014)
Auteurs : Michael PIERSE, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 44 n 1 Spring/Summer 2014)
Article en page(s) : p. 92-115
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

ESSAI

IRLANDE

LANGUE IRLANDAISE

LITTERATURE

PIECE DE THEATRE

ROYAUME-UNI

Résumé : As Susan Bassnett and Harish Trivedi argue, ‘translation does not happen in a vacuum, but in a continuum; it is not an isolated act, it is part of an ongoing process of intercultural transfer’. In understanding Brendan Behan's most celebrated and controversial translation, of his spare Irish language play "An Giall" (1958) to its riotous English counterpart "The Hostage" (1958), understanding the problematic ‘intercultural transfer’ between British and Irish life in the 1950s is crucial. Comparisons between both works reveal significant changes that illuminate Behan's relationship with both nations and provide a sometimes oblique metacommentary regarding his most pressing political and personal anxieties. Yet for all their differences, the plays also share a common desire to transcend the divisions forged by the colonial experience through critical understandings of life on either side of the Irish Sea. In this essay, the author argues that Behan's act of transculturation reveals a great deal more reflexivity and depth than many of his critics would allow, developing an iconoclastic dialogue between British and Irish mid-century life.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Lieu de publication : Edimbourg
Fonds : Médiathèque