Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : An Umbrella, a Pair of Boots, and a Spacious Nothing : McGahern and Beckett (2014)
Auteurs : Richard ROBINSON, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 44 n 2 Autumn/Winter 2014)
Article en page(s) : p. 323-340
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

ECRIVAIN

ESSAI

LITTERATURE

PHILOSOPHIE

THEATRE

Résumé : This essay argues that an assessment of the Beckettian qualities of McGahern's work should take into account the recent scholarship which has explored Beckett's absorption in philosophy. The author of the present essay follows Husserl's injunction ‘go back to the things themselves’: first, to the significance of the umbrella, an over-determined sexual signified, in ‘My Love, My Umbrella’; and second to the extended representation of the father's boots in "The Dark". These objects of ridicule and affect have their own obliquely Beckettian lineage as the ‘presence between’ ("Watt") the post-Cartesian body and the uncaring object world, though they do not attain the ideal of epidermal ‘impermeability’ mentioned in Beckett's "Proust". McGahern also shares Beckett's interest in the Democritean idea that ‘Nothing is more real than nothing’ ("Malone Dies"), though under such conditions McGahern clings more tenaciously to the materiality of the memory-image, whereas to Beckett the image may be sullied by memory (Deleuze) or simply ‘done’ in the present. However, McGahern is aware that his aesthetic cannot be fully mastered by a transcendent Mnemosyne, and that the recalcitrant present may refuse to budge. Finally, a strange contemporaneity is shown to emerge between ‘The Wine Breath’ and the "Shades" of Beckett's late televisual work, both of which are revisited by Yeatsian ghosts.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Lieu de publication : Edimbourg
Fonds : Médiathèque