Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: Trust Not Appearances : Political and Personal Betrayal in James Joyce's Ulysses (2014)
Authors: Gerry SMYTH, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Irish University Review (Vol 44 n 2 Autumn/Winter 2014)
Article on page: p. 254-271
Languages: English
Descriptors:

CULTURE

ESSAY

LITERATURE

SOCIETY

WRITER

Abstract: Literary historians such as Tony Tanner have speculated that adultery, with its assault upon the patriarchal institution of marriage and its potential for family drama, is the principal theme of the bourgeois novel that evolves in Europe during the nineteenth century. Joyce's famous work was heir to the great nineteenth-century novel of adultery – a tradition which includes the likes of Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina" (1873–77), Flaubert's "Madame Bovary" (1857), and Zola's "Thérèse Raquin" (1867). An act of marital betrayal lies at the heart of the story, an act which Joyce explores in all its emotional and moral complexity. Other critics (such as David Lloyd) have argued that his condition as an Irish writer obliged Joyce to develop an ‘adulterated’ form of writing – one which refused the precepts of patriarchal authorship, and in so doing contributed significantly to the emergence of the cultural sensibility known as Modernism. This article addresses Joyce's imagination of personal and political betrayal as explored in both the thematic and formal aspects of "Ulysses".
Publishing country : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Place of publication : Edimbourg
Collection : Médiathèque