Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

You will need to present a pass sanitaire

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

You will need to present a pass sanitaire

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: Mirror up to nation : Synge and Shakespeare (2015)
Authors: Anthony ROCHE, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Irish University Review (Vol 45 n 1 Spring/Summer 2015)
Article on page: p. 9-24
Languages: English
Descriptors:

ESSAY

LITERATURE

THEATRE

WRITER

Abstract: Christopher Murray, Philip Edwards, and Rebecca Steinburger have examined the ways in which the Irish Dramatic Revival drew on the example and plays of Shakespeare. Their emphasis falls on Yeats and O'Casey, both of whom have written extensively on Shakespeare in their prose essays and autobiographies. The allusions to Shakespeare by Synge are much briefer and more cryptic. And yet there is a deep and complex relationship between Shakespeare and Synge, as this essay will indicate. The one writer who has paired the two is James Joyce, in the Library chapter of "Ulysses", set in the same year that Ireland's National Theatre was founded. The essay also looks at the neglected fact that Synge, while an undergraduate at Trinity College, Dublin, took lectures on Shakespeare from Professor Edward Dowden and made copious extracts from Dowden's "Shakespeare: His Mind and Art". The essay goes on to examine Synge's key remarks on Shakespeare in relation to Irish writers and to compare the return of the dead father in "The Playboy of the Western World" and "Hamlet".
Publishing country : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Place of publication : Edimbourg
Collection : Médiathèque