Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Mirror up to nation : Synge and Shakespeare (2015)
Auteurs : Anthony ROCHE, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 45 n 1 Spring/Summer 2015)
Article en page(s) : p. 9-24
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

ECRIVAIN

ESSAI

LITTERATURE

THEATRE

Résumé : Christopher Murray, Philip Edwards, and Rebecca Steinburger have examined the ways in which the Irish Dramatic Revival drew on the example and plays of Shakespeare. Their emphasis falls on Yeats and O'Casey, both of whom have written extensively on Shakespeare in their prose essays and autobiographies. The allusions to Shakespeare by Synge are much briefer and more cryptic. And yet there is a deep and complex relationship between Shakespeare and Synge, as this essay will indicate. The one writer who has paired the two is James Joyce, in the Library chapter of "Ulysses", set in the same year that Ireland's National Theatre was founded. The essay also looks at the neglected fact that Synge, while an undergraduate at Trinity College, Dublin, took lectures on Shakespeare from Professor Edward Dowden and made copious extracts from Dowden's "Shakespeare: His Mind and Art". The essay goes on to examine Synge's key remarks on Shakespeare in relation to Irish writers and to compare the return of the dead father in "The Playboy of the Western World" and "Hamlet".
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Lieu de publication : Edimbourg
Fonds : Médiathèque