Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Doing her spiriting : Lady Morgan's Irish Tempests (2015)
Auteurs : Benedicte SEYNHAEVE, Auteur ; Raphaël INGELBIEN, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 45 n 2 Autumn/Winter 2015)
Article en page(s) : p. 242-262
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

ESSAI

LITTERATURE

PIECE DE THEATRE

THEATRE

Résumé : Several studies have tried to answer the question ‘where is Ireland in "The Tempest"?’, while others have assessed Ireland's sense of its own postcoloniality through Irish writers' engagement with Shakespeare's most ‘colonial’ play. This essay argues that Lady Morgan's national tales offer the first significant Irish rewritings of "The Tempest". It shows how her allusions to the play constitute coherent intertextual patterns, informed by a clear sense of parallels between the enchanted isle of Shakespeare's imagination and Ireland around the time of the Act of Union. Those parallels, however, challenge the idea that "The Tempest" illustrates a (post)colonial relation between Ireland and Britain. Instead, Morgan's focus on the spells cast on foreign visitors by the island and by the native magic of Prospero and Ariel suggests that she used the play in order to allegorize possible ways of making the Union work, rather than to impugn the illegitimacy of colonial rule. Her last and most pessimistic national tale embryonically sketches a wild, native Irish Caliban who would later recur in both British and Irish imaginations with the rise of militant radical nationalism, but Morgan's version of the figure still shows important differences with subsequent postcolonial embodiments of Irish otherness. Although seminal in many ways, Morgan's rewritings of "The Tempest" only later make room for more conflictual uses of the play as an allegory of British-Irish relations.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Lieu de publication : Edimbourg
Fonds : Médiathèque