Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : The Ages of a Woman and the Middle Ages (2015)
Auteurs : Eilean NI CHUILLEANAIN, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 45 n 2 Autumn/Winter 2015)
Article en page(s) : p. 199-214
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

ESSAI

POESIE

FOLKLORE

HISTOIRE

MOYEN AGE

FEMMES

Résumé : This essay springs from the experience of translating the Old Irish ‘Song of the Woman of Beare’, and from researching its reception in the twentieth century. The poem was rediscovered in the 1890s and the scholarly reaction is tinged with Victorian preoccupations, including the bohemian cult of François Villon. In Ireland it is aligned with Pearse's ‘Mise Eire’, and with the work of later poets such as Austin Clarke. But as well as voicing the ancient text, the Woman of Beare appears in folklore in both Ireland and Scotland, and there are interesting parallels and divergences between the traditions of scholarship and the figure in the popular imagination. The author's account of the impact of both text and myth shows a development through the mid-twentieth century and into the twenty-first, in the work of poets writing in both Irish and English. In recent decades the work of women poets has engaged with the myths of the Cailleach as Goddess, and they have thus confronted questions of the legitimacy of treating the past, and especially mythology and folk beliefs, as a source for poetry.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Lieu de publication : Edimbourg
Fonds : Médiathèque