Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : From Brigit to Bailegangaire : The Development of Tom Murphy's Mommo Trilogy (2016)
Auteurs : Shaun RICHARDS, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 46 n 2 Autumn/Winter 2016)
Article en page(s) : p. 324-339
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

ESSAI

FAMINE

LITTERATURE

PIECE DE THEATRE

THEATRE

XIXE SIECLE

Résumé : Tom Murphy's "Bailegangaire", premiered by Druid Theatre, Galway, in 1985 has its origins in a three-part TV drama which Murphy started planning in 1981. Of the three scripts only one, "Brigit", was screened by RTÉ in 1988, "The Contest" became "A Thief of a Christmas" which was staged by the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, in 1988, and "Mommo", the last of the projected trilogy, became "Bailegangaire". In 2014, nearly 30 years after its premiere, Druid staged "Bailegangaire" in tandem with "Brigit" which Murphy had reworked for the theatre, a pairing which, in bringing the fraught relationship of Mommo and her husband, Seamus, to the fore, helped clarify the grounds of the trauma informing her endless, but never completed narrative. This essay uses Murphy's notebooks and drafts, along with a comparison of "Brigit" in both its TV and theatre forms, to show how Murphy progressively refined "Bailegangaire" into a drama whose causal chain stretches back to psychological states forged under the stresses of the Irish Famine.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Lieu de publication : Edimbourg
Fonds : Médiathèque