Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Everything not saved will be lost : Videogames, Violence, and Memory in Contemporary Irish Fiction (2017)
Auteurs : Claire LYNCH, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 47 n 1 Spring/Summer 2017)
Article en page(s) : p. 126-142
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

LITTERATURE

SOCIETE

Résumé : In Paul Murray's Skippy Dies (2010), Eimear McBride's A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing (2013) and Rob Doyle's Here Are the Young Men (2014), fictional characters are depicted playing both real and imagined videogames featuring a number of avatar perspectives. Unlike the fragile human body, an avatar can survive multiple virtual deaths; kicks, punches, bullet wounds, even decapitations, can all be undone, the virtual body resurrected and the game re-played. The blurring of player and avatar which takes place during gameplay raises several questions about how memory is experienced, articulated, and mediated. Do an avatar's actions subsequently become a player's memories? Does playing videogames alter memory or shape the way a player interacts with the past? And perhaps most crucially, when an avatar stabs, punches, or shoots an opponent, does the player remember that act of violence as a witness or a collaborator?
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Fonds : Médiathèque