Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Fermeture exceptionnelle vendredi 27 mai et lundi 6 juin.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Fermeture exceptionnelle vendredi 27 mai et lundi 6 juin.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Moving towards Multidirectionality : Famine Memory, Migration and the Slavery Past in Fiction, 1860–1890 (2017)
Auteurs : Marguérite CORPORAAL, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 47 n 1 Spring/Summer 2017)
Article en page(s) : p. 48-61
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

FAMINE

MIGRATION

SOCIETE

Résumé : What happens to memories when migrants carry their pasts with them to their receiving countries? How do these migrated memories of a past originally connected to the native country develop when they intersect with the cultural legacies of other communities? Fiction which remembers Ireland's Great Famine and which was written between 1854 and 1890 provides an interesting case study to explore these questions: many novels and short stories which recollected the bleak years of mass starvation were written and published in North-America, the continent where the largest percentage of emigrants of the Famine generation settled. As this article will demonstrate, these early works of Famine fiction frequently testify to the ‘multidirectional’ (Rothberg 2009) nature of memory in cultural transfer, in that reconfigurations of the Famine past interact with memories of the Middle Passage and current as well as past debates on slavery in the American South.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Fonds : Médiathèque