Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: There's ropes and there's ropes : The Moral and Textual Fibre of Martin McDonagh's Hangmen (2018)
Authors: José LANTERS, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Irish University Review (Vol 48 n 2 Autumn/Winter 2018)
Article on page: p. 315-330
Languages: English
Descriptors:

CRITICISM

THEATRE

Abstract: Martin McDonagh's Hangmen (2015) is concerned with the moral question of justice. Set in a northern English pub run by a former hangman, the play's action takes place in 1965, on the day capital punishment is abolished in Britain. Combining (meta)fictional elements with details from actual criminal cases (in particular the so-called A6 murder, for which James Hanratty was hanged in 1963), Hangmen weaves three potential plot lines around its enigmatic central character, Peter Mooney. These conflicting narratives highlight that justice and punishment always exist as stories embedded in a context, which are invariably partial, composed for a purpose, and open to interpretation. Incorporating ideas from Nietzsche and Kierkegaard, Hangmen suggests that any justice system reflects the implicit biases of the society in which it operates.
Publishing country : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Collection : Médiathèque