Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Beyond a Capitalist Atlantic : Fish, Fuel, and the Collapse of Cheap Nature in Ireland, Newfoundland, and Nigeria (2019)
Auteurs : Michael PAYE, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Irish University Review (Vol 49 n 1 Spring/Summer 2019)
Article en page(s) : p. 117-134
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

CINEMA

DOCUMENTAIRE

ENVIRONNEMENT

LITTERATURE

LITTERATURE ETRANGERE

Résumé : Irish director Risteard O'Domhnaill's 2010 film, The Pipe, documents the battle of a small Mayo community against the Corrib gas pipeline project, following a number of local residents in their eight-year struggle against state-sponsored and corporate violence. In his next major production, Atlantic (2016), a comparative documentary of fishing and fossil-fuel industries in Ireland, Newfoundland, and Norway, O'Domhnaill retreats from the possible anti-systematicity of the Rossport struggle, taking a reformist, nationalist attitude to the question of oil and fish extraction. In this article, I will demonstrate how O'Domhnaill naturalizes this mobilization and ‘cheapening’ through a vocabulary of rightful ownership and human-centric dominance. Using world-ecological and energy humanities theories, I will then demonstrate that numerous other contemporary depictions of life and labour at the fish and oil frontiers, across the Global North and South, articulate how systemic contradiction materializes as environmental violence, focusing on works by Irish author Mike McCormack, Canadian author Lisa Moore, and Nigerian author Nnedi Okorafor.
Pays de publication : Grande-Bretagne (Royaume Uni)
Fonds : Médiathèque