Centre Culturel Irlandais



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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: Katherine Philips, "Philo-Philippa" and Restoration Dublin (2018)
Authors: Andrew CARPENTER, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Eighteenth-Century Ireland (vol. 33 2018)
Article on page: p. 11-32
Languages: English
Descriptors:

LITERATURE

POETRY

WOMEN

18TH CENTURY

Abstract: This article suggests that "To the excellent Orinda" (a poem written in Dublin in 1663 and printed in the appendix to this article) is not, as it purports to be, an encomiastic priase poem honouring the Anglo-Welsh poet Katherine Philips who, during her short stay in Dublin in 1662-63 had become a member of a poetic coterie involving members of the vice-regal court in Dublin Castle; on the contrary, it is a hoax. At the time she first read the poem, Philips was the recipient of many elaborate poems genuinely praising her as a poet glorifying friendship, and as the translator of Corneille's tragedy La Mort de Pompée; but when she first set eyes on this poem - signed "Philo-Philippa" - she was unsettled by it and queried the author's claim to be a woman. The poem certainly appears to be the work of a fiercely feminist female poet living in Dublin but it is suggested in this article that the poem is not a genuine praise poem but a parody of a praise poem, that it is ridiculously over-elaborate, over-blown burlesque, and that it might well be the work of a group of cynical young lawyers recently arrived from London to work in the Court of Claims. The article claims that the traditional reading of "To the excellent Orinda" misses the joke and that the poem is far from being a serious one praising Katherine Philips.
Publishing country : Irlande
Collection : Médiathèque