Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés
Le Centre Culturel Irlandais est dans l’obligation de fermer ses portes au public vendredi 13 mars 2020 à 18h, et jusqu’à nouvel ordre.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés
Le Centre Culturel Irlandais est dans l’obligation de fermer ses portes au public vendredi 13 mars 2020 à 18h, et jusqu’à nouvel ordre.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Katherine Philips, "Philo-Philippa" and Restoration Dublin (2018)
Auteurs : Andrew CARPENTER, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Eighteenth-Century Ireland (vol. 33 2018)
Article en page(s) : p. 11-32
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

LITTERATURE

POESIE

FEMMES

XVIIIE SIECLE

Résumé : This article suggests that "To the excellent Orinda" (a poem written in Dublin in 1663 and printed in the appendix to this article) is not, as it purports to be, an encomiastic priase poem honouring the Anglo-Welsh poet Katherine Philips who, during her short stay in Dublin in 1662-63 had become a member of a poetic coterie involving members of the vice-regal court in Dublin Castle; on the contrary, it is a hoax. At the time she first read the poem, Philips was the recipient of many elaborate poems genuinely praising her as a poet glorifying friendship, and as the translator of Corneille's tragedy La Mort de Pompée; but when she first set eyes on this poem - signed "Philo-Philippa" - she was unsettled by it and queried the author's claim to be a woman. The poem certainly appears to be the work of a fiercely feminist female poet living in Dublin but it is suggested in this article that the poem is not a genuine praise poem but a parody of a praise poem, that it is ridiculously over-elaborate, over-blown burlesque, and that it might well be the work of a group of cynical young lawyers recently arrived from London to work in the Court of Claims. The article claims that the traditional reading of "To the excellent Orinda" misses the joke and that the poem is far from being a serious one praising Katherine Philips.
Pays de publication : Irlande
Fonds : Médiathèque