Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

The Médiathèque will exceptionally close on Friday 27 May and Monday 6 June.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

The Médiathèque will exceptionally close on Friday 27 May and Monday 6 June.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: The Orphan Decade : Elizabeth Bowen’s 1930s Novels (2017)
Authors: Anna TEEKELL, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 42 n 2 Automne-hiver 2017)
Article on page: p. 139-151
Languages: English
Descriptors:

20TH CENTURY

LITERATURE

WRITER

Abstract: This essay reads Elizabeth Bowen’s major novels of the 1930s – all of which feature orphaned protagonists – as mimetic of a decade that has often been critically “orphaned” in literary history. Bowen’s travelling orphans exemplify the problem of the political refugee in the 1930s, and her novels’ deliberately unresolved endings demonstrate an unwillingness to look into a future that seemed already foreclosed. By examining the novels of this orphan decade, in which the characters as well as the prose are simultaneously arrested and on the move, this essay offers a reassessment of Bowen’s novels’ importance to the way we read the 1930s.
Publishing country : France
Collection : Médiathèque