Centre Culturel Irlandais



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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: Making a scene : The Diceman's Queer Performance Activism and Irish Public Culture (2017)
Authors: Tina O'TOOLE, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 42 n 1 Printemps-été 2017)
Article on page: p. 169-185
Languages: English
Descriptors:

IRELAND

SOCIETY

20TH CENTURY

CULTURE

Abstract: This essay explores two key interventions in the twentieth-century urban history of Irish LGBTQ+ protest. Over the past five decades, there has been a transformation in attitudes to / representations of sexual identities in Ireland. Ever since 1983, when a broad-based protest march moved through Dublin in response to the gaybashing and murder of Declan Flynn in Fairview Park, street demonstrations, guerrilla theatre, and public performance have been used by Irish queer activists to protest the pathologising of sexualities and impact of biopower on all of our lives. Focusing on the street theatre of “The Diceman” [Thom McGinty], this essay captures the public staging of Irish queer resistance in 1980s/90s Dublin. Drawing on Judith Butler’s theory of performance activism (and its roots in Hannah Arendt’s work), it explores the The Diceman’s key role in creating a public identity for Irish LBGTQ+ people in the period before the decriminalization of (male) homosexuality in 1993. Extending the analysis to queer Irish migrants in New York in the same period, the essay argues that performance activism was crucial to the emergence of queer political action in the Irish public sphere.

Publishing country : France
Collection : Médiathèque