Centre Culturel Irlandais



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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: "We're Only Monsters" : Punk Bodies and the Grotesque in 1970s Northern Ireland (2017)
Authors: Timothy A. HERON, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 42 n 1 Printemps-été 2017)
Article on page: p. 139-154
Languages: English
Descriptors:

CULTURE

NORTHERN IRELAND

NORTHERN IRELAND CONFLICT

SOCIETY

20TH CENTURY

Abstract: Throughout the late 1970s and early 1980s, at a time when cross-community contact was relatively uncommon in Northern Ireland, the punk subculture attracted both young Catholics and Protestants who temporarily set aside their political, religious and class differences. These young people signalled their participation in the subculture by adopting a dress style which, at the time, was considered shocking. Indeed, punk bodies were interpreted by observers and constructed by punks themselves in terms that evoked the grotesque, the abject and the monstrous. Such bodies were also a common feature in punk iconography and appeared in punk rock songs. In this paper I aim to show how Northern Irish punks, by displaying and celebrating these bodily characteristics in a society where they were generally used to identify and describe the “other” in a sectarian framework, threatened to disturb order and encouraged or at least enabled the transgression of gender and sectarian boundaries.

Publishing country : France
Collection : Médiathèque