Centre Culturel Irlandais



Forgotten password?

Portal of collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Home

Select language

Address

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays
The Centre Culturel Irlandais is obliged to close its doors to the public on Friday 13 March 2020 at 6pm, and until further notice.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays
The Centre Culturel Irlandais is obliged to close its doors to the public on Friday 13 March 2020 at 6pm, and until further notice.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: 'Waging War on the Streets' : the Irish Women Patrol, 1914-22 (2014)
Authors: Senia PASETA, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Irish Historical Studies (vol. 39 n 154 2014)
Article on page: p. 250-271
Languages: English
Descriptors:

HISTORY

WOMEN

SOCIETY

JOB/EMPLOYMENT

20TH CENTURY

Abstract: Female activists across the United Kingdom had insisted from the late nineteenth century that the employment of women police who would deal with problems specific to women and children could help to address pressing social questions, or at least to offer women some protection within the entirely male criminal justice system. Their campaign for women police was connected with similar demands for the employment of female prison visitors and inspectors and, later, jurors and lawyers, and it was predicated on the idea that neither prisons nor courts afforded women fair and equal treatment under the law. Early victories included the appointment of police matrons and searchers, but the resistance of police authorities and most other civil servants to female officers remained solid into the early twentieth century, feminists campaigning notwithstanding. The outbreak of the First World War, however, provided an ideal context for renewed activism on the issue
Publishing country : Irlande
Place of publication : Dublin
Statement of responsibility : Senia Paseta
Collection : Médiathèque