Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Childhood Narratives in Contemporary Irish Novels (2015)
Auteurs : Sylvie MIKOWSKI, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 40 n 1 2015)
Article en page(s) : p. 357-368
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

AUTOBIOGRAPHIE

IRLANDE

LITTERATURE

ROMAN

XXE SIECLE

Résumé : The image of childhood as reflected through literature has evolved through time and places, even though it is almost intrinsic to autobiography and is essential to the genre of the Bildungsroman. Childhood narratives do not only allow writers to convey a critique of society as seen through the eyes of an naive, innocent child, or to explore the roots of their own artistic vocation. They also represent a challenge for the writer who has to invent or imitate the language of a character who is not yet in full command of words. In Ireland, one of the master childhood narratives is James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, in which Stephen Dedalus discovers language in his early childhood and later decides to become an artist working with words. This article studies four contemporary Irish childhood narratives which each in its own way exemplify the main features of the genre: Hugo Hamilton's The Speckled People, Roddy Doyle's Paddy Clark HaHaHa, Claire Keegan's Foster and Patrick McCabe's The Butcher Boy. The interest of these four novels lies in their concern not just with he representation of childhood but also with the recreation of a specific language associated with this period of life
Pays de publication : France
Lieu de publication : Rennes
Mention de responsabilité : Sylvie Mikowski
Fonds : Médiathèque