Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : A Dublin Rape of the Lock : John Wilson's Crocker's Amazoniad (2014)
Auteurs : Andrew J. GARAVEL, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Eighteenth-Century Ireland (vol. 29 2014)
Article en page(s) : p. 108-129
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

HISTOIRE

LITTERATURE

POESIE

ROYAUME-UNI

XVIIIE SIECLE

Résumé : The Amazoniad (1806), a mock-heroic poem in five cantos written in the style of Alexander Pope's verse satires, lampoons Dublin society in the aftermath of the Union of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801. In it John Wilson Croker, regarded as one of the founders of the modern Conservative party, attacks the newly formed Whig government and its local representative, the lord lieutenant of Ireland and his court. Central to The Amazoniad (which has not received any critical attention until now) is the notion of performance: one of its two main episodes takes place in a theatre, and a principal object of its satire is the performance the Whigs are supposedly putting on to both overawe and mollify the Irish people, who were largely in a state of nervous uncertainty and discontent after the tumultuous events of the previous years (the United Irishmen Rebellion of 1798 and the permanent dissolution of the Irish Parliament in 1800). The poem sheds light on a particularly anxious moment of Irish life and offers evidence that the influence wielded by some women during the period of an independent Irish Parliament had already contracted by the early days of the Union
Pays de publication : Irlande
Lieu de publication : Dublin
Mention de responsabilité : Andrew J. Garavel
Fonds : Médiathèque