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Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

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Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : 'This Ultima Thule' : The Cape of Good Hope, Ireland and global networks of empire, 1795-1815 (2014)
Auteurs : John MCALEER, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Eighteenth-Century Ireland (vol. 29 2014)
Article en page(s) : p. 63-84
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

HISTOIRE

POLITIQUE

ROYAUME-UNI

XVIIIE SIECLE

Résumé : When Britain captured the Cape of Good Hope at the end of the eighteenth century, it was already part of a sophisticated maritime system and commercial interests. But the first decades of British rule in Southern Africa facilitated the development of another set of connections and exchanges: three of the first four British civilian governors came from Ireland. The governorships of Lord Macartney and Lord Caledon in particular reveal how a geographically disparate community reflecting Irish contacts, concerns and contexts was consolidated using the maritime connections of the burgeoning British Empire. Many of the contacts these men forged, the requests for patronage they attracted, and the news and intelligence they received were a consequence of their Irish backgrounds. Lord Caledon, for example, was at the heart of a set of overseas correspondents that preserved local community connections focused on a small village in south Tyrone. But other aspects of late-eighteenth-century Ireland mobile, subversive and revolutionary were also dispersed across this global empire. The upheavals of 1798, for example, reverberated well beyond the shores of the British Isles. This article demonstrates how the complexities and ambiguities of Ireland's place in the British Empire were preserved, recreated and reshaped far away from Europe by maritime circuits of communication and exchange. By focusing on the example of the Cape, the discussion illustrated the ways in which eighteenth-century Ireland influenced, and was in turn influenced by, the networks of empire extending across the British World at this time
Pays de publication : Irlande
Lieu de publication : Dublin
Mention de responsabilité : John McAleer
Fonds : Médiathèque