Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

You will need to present a pass sanitaire

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

You will need to present a pass sanitaire

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: An Art that Knows its Mind : Prayer, Poetry and Post-Catholic Identity in Seamus Heaney's "Squarings" (2014)
Authors: Eugene O'BRIEN, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 39 n 2 2014)
Article on page: p. 127-143
Languages: English
Descriptors:

20TH CENTURY

LITERATURE

POETRY

RELIGION

WRITER

Abstract: Seamus Heaney's "Squarings" sequence's 1991 collection Seeing Things of the "virtue of an art that knows its mind". This sequence attempts to know the mind in both its immanent and transcendent aspects, through the art of poetry. Heaney is writing in this sequence about issues of the spirit, about the numinous and the search for transcendence. The poems have what one could term a religious subtext and yet they are not religious in terms of Jean-Luc Nancy's triadic formulation, they are more poetry and philosophy than prayer. And yet this article argues that they are more poetry and philosophy than prayer. And yet this article argues that they are prayer as well, but a prayer transformed almost a new form of secular prayer which acknowledges that which is beyond the range of human experience but which does so on its own terms, without any overt reference to the rule and precepts of the Roman Catholic Church, but which channels religious symbolism as a type of cultural unconscious throughout the sequence
Publishing country : France
Place of publication : Villeneuve d'Ascq
Statement of responsibility : Eugene O'Brien
Collection : Médiathèque