Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: The Irish Economy : From Lame Duck to Celtic Tiger (2002)
Authors: Dermot MCALEESE, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 27 n 1 2002)
Article on page: p. 161-182
Languages: English
Descriptors:

ECONOMY

EUROPE

POLITICS

SOCIETY

Abstract: Ireland's recent economic growth the Celtic Tiger phenomenon has attracted world attention. This paper outlines the changes it has effected on people's lives through enhanced prosperity, greater availability of jobs and lower poverty. The economic transformation is attributed to several factors that proved mutually self-reinforcing: a booming US economy, EU structural funds and other support, stabilisation of government finances and low taxes and social partnership. Challenges to the more prosperous Ireland are also analysed, including the prospect of soon becoming a net donor to the EU, and danger of a loss of competitiveness due to rising pay costs, lower productivity growth and an unpredictable euro exchange rate. The No vote in the Nice referendum last year let to a reappraisal of Ireland's reputation as a good European and reversing that decision will take considerable effort. Ireland has been hit by the slowdown in the world economy, and the Celtic Tiger growth rates of the 1990s are unlikely to be repeated. Nevertheless important structural change in the economy has occurred and this bodes well for the future
Publishing country : France
Place of publication : Villeneuve d'Ascq
Statement of responsibility : Dermot McAleese
Collection : Médiathèque