Centre Culturel Irlandais

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Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

The Médiathèque will be closed on Friday 15 July
and from 1 to 26 August

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Opening hours

Monday to Friday: 2pm - 6pm
Late opening on Wednesday until 8pm
Closed at weekends and on bank holidays

The Médiathèque will be closed on Friday 15 July
and from 1 to 26 August

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Head of Libraries and Archives

Marion Mossu
Libraries and Archives Officer

Tel : 00 33 1 58 52 10 83 / 33

Where to find us ?

Beside the Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Metros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Buses : 84, 89, 21, 27

Map

Title: Reflections on the Future (1999)
Authors: Claire CONNOLLY, Author
Material Type: Article
In : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 24 n 2 1999)
Article on page: p. 115-125
Languages: English
Descriptors:

18TH CENTURY

FRANCO-IRISH RELATIONS

HISTORY

POLITICS

Abstract: This essay speculates as to the meanings of Edmund Burke's reflections on eighteenth century France for twentieth century Ireland. Gar O'Donnell, the protagonist of Brian Friel's Philadelphia, Here I Come! repeatedly quotes from a famous passage in Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790). First performed in 1964, Philadelphia? Here I Come! uses lines from Burke's elegy for ancient regime Europe to evoke multiple memories both for the protagonist and the audience of the play. This essay argues that rather than just enabling Friel to index decayed tradition (Seamus Deane's suggestion), the Reflection is a text turned to the future. I show how, read anachronistically, the Reflections may be interpreted as a comment on later moments in Irish history, in this case the Act of Union with Britain, passed in January 1801. Understood as a proleptic comment on the Union, the Reflections enables a new account of that legislative event as a cultural and political fantasy of a revolutionary nature
Publishing country : France
Place of publication : Villeneuve d'Ascq
Statement of responsibility : Claire Connolly
Collection : Médiathèque