Centre Culturel Irlandais



Mot de passe oublié ?

Portail des collections

Centre Culturel Irlandais

Accueil

Sélection de la langue

Adresse

Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

contact

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Le CCI est dans l'obligation de fermer ses portes le jeudi 29 octobre à 18h et jusqu'à nouvel ordre.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Le CCI est dans l'obligation de fermer ses portes le jeudi 29 octobre à 18h et jusqu'à nouvel ordre.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Titre : Black Habits and White Collars : Representations of the Irish Industrial Schools (2011)
Auteurs : Peter GUY, Auteur
Type de document : Article
Dans : Etudes irlandaises (Vol 36 n 1 2011)
Article en page(s) : p. 59-72
Langues: Anglais
Mots-clés :

SOCIETE

EDUCATION

LITTERATURE

RELIGION

Résumé : The Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse (CICA) is one of a range of measures introduced by the Irish Government to investigate the extent and effects of abuse on children from 1936 onwards. It is commonly known in Ireland as the Ryan Commission after its chair, Justice Sean Ryan. The Commission's remit was to investigate all forms of child abuse in Irish institutions for children; the majority of allegations it investigated related to the system of sixty residential "Reformatory and Industrial Schools" operated by Catholic Church orders, funded and supervised by the Irish Department of Education. This essay examines the critical reaction to the revelations and the correlation between the Irish Industrial Schools and the Soviet labour camp system. The appellation "The Irish Gulag" was coined by the journalist and critic Bruce Arnold and is apt, for as I demonstrate there are a number of parallels between the memoirs of former prison inmates in the Soviet Union and those who wrote about their experience in the Irish Industrial Schools. As a contrast, I also draw upon fictive accounts of life in the schools by writers such as Bernard McLaverty and John McGahern
Pays de publication : France
Lieu de publication : Rennes
Mention de responsabilité : Peter Guy
Fonds : Médiathèque