Centre Culturel Irlandais



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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

La Médiathèque sera fermée du 20 décembre au 7 janvier

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Un pass sanitaire vous sera demandé

La Médiathèque sera fermée du 20 décembre au 7 janvier

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

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The English Language Issue: Irish Studies in Japan

Article

This essay seeks to give an overview of Irish Studies in Japan. I outline the institutional context and climate within which Irish Studies scholars operate in Japan, present a brief account of the history and achievements of, and specific challe[...]
Les télévisions celtiques TG4, S4C, BBC Alba, France 3 Bretagne, Brezhoweb

Article

Les chaînes de télévision en langue celtique TG4 (Irlande), S4C (Pays de Galles), BBC Alba (Écosse), France 3 Bretagne (pour ses émissions en breton) et Brezhoweb (France, Bretagne) reposent sur des langues dont la démographie linguistique reste[...]

Livre

Irish inhabitants of the 'four obedient shires' - a term commonly used to describe the region at the heart of the English colony in the later Middle Ages - were significantly anglicised, taking on English names, dress, and even legal status. How[...]
Beyond the Rhyming Weavers

Article

This paper examines the origin, development and construction of John Hewitt's concept of the Rhyming Weavers. It argues that there is a need to reassess his concept in the light of contemporary critical concerns, and to develop critical percepti[...]
Broadcasting Ulster-Scots

Article

In recent years BBC Northern Ireland (BBCNI) has responded to a growing interest in Ulster-Scots language and culture by producing a range of Ulster-Scots television and radio programmes and online media. This paper broadly summarises BBCNI outp[...]
Common Identity

Article

This paper is designed to show how my involvement in the development of the early Ulster-Scots movement has evolved in recent years towards using the Ulster-Scots tradition as part of a broader panoply of cultural expression. It highlights the w[...]
Fiddles, Flutes, Drums and Fifes

Article

This article sets out to provide a broad overview of how Ulster-Scots cultural identity is presented today through music, dance and song. Historical background explains the origins of the cultural identity and how the cultural revival evolved fr[...]
The Irish Ulster Scots

Article

Liam Logan, someone from an Irish nationalist background, gives his perspective on Ulster Scots as a cross-community tongue. Ulster Scots has been unfairly burdened with politics and has suffered misunderstanding as a result. The article also at[...]
Language and Politics in Ireland

Article

This paper demonstrates that the idea that a language, a culture and a nation are tied together as one single unit just because they share the same name is almost always fundamentally flawed. In Northern Ireland, the tying together of "Irish lan[...]
Poetic Justice

Article

Since John Hewitt's mid-twentieth century research stimulated interest in the "rhyming weavers", awareness has been growing among scholars of the richness of the Ulster-Scots literary tradition. This essay considers historic and linguistic conne[...]
Publishing the "Invisible" Language

Article

Access to authentic written Ulster-Scots material is essential to its progress as a European Regional Minority Language. This study examines the competing pressures governing its publication, within the unusual political system in Northern Irela[...]