Centre Culturel Irlandais



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Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Fermeture exceptionnelle vendredi 27 mai et lundi 6 juin.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Fermeture exceptionnelle vendredi 27 mai et lundi 6 juin.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Mots-clés

> IRLANDE DU NORD

IRLANDE DU NORD

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Livre

Irish history is often past and furious and nowhere more contentiously than when discussing religion. This book is designed to be read with equal profit by those who know a little and those who know a lot about the role of religion in Irish hist[...]

Livre

Sixty-eight renowned journalists tell their stories of working in Northern Ireland during the Troubles – the victims that they have never forgotten, the events that have never left them, and the lasting impact of the experience of working throug[...]

Livre

In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of[...]
La « force illocutionnaire » et l’« usage stratégique du langage » dans les discours du DUP et du Sinn Féin

Article

Depuis le mois de mai 2007, les partis politiques autrefois considérés comme les plus radicaux d’Irlande du Nord se partagent le pouvoir politique dans le cadre de la dévolution dans la Province. Si l’on se positionne strictement du côté des de[...]
I cannot rub this strangeness from my sight

Article

Focussing on the poems in Sinéad Morrissey's Through the Square Window (2009), this essay examines how the poet envisions a transformed, post-troubles Belfast through a range of perspectives, shifting her attention away from but not entirely for[...]
Something Happening Quietly

Article

This article concerns the Belfast dramatist Owen McCafferty (1961–) and his play Quietly, which debuted at the Abbey's Peacock Theatre in November 2012. Considering antecedents in McCafferty's earlier work, it illustrates how the play reflects a[...]
The Trouble(s) with Transitional Justice

Article

David Park's The Truth Commissioner (2008) tells the story of a fictional truth commission, established in the wake of the Northern Irish Troubles. To date, one of the most striking things about Northern Ireland has been its reluctance to engage[...]
"Bubbles of joy"

Article

This essay considers the representation of pleasure in three “post”-conflict Northern Irish texts: Glenn Patterson’s novel The Rest Just Follows (2014), Billy Cowan’s play Still Ill (2014) and Lucy Caldwell’s short story collection Multitudes (2[...]
The Meaning of Moving On

Article

‘Trauma’ has become a pervasive trope in discourse and practice concerned with the affective legacies of the Northern Ireland Troubles. This article argues that its productivity may now be exhausted. Whether homogenised as the trace of an unspea[...]
Parallel Games and Queer Memories

Article

This essay explores how the notion of ‘parallel games’ works to queer memory in two productions of Northern Ireland's first publicly funded gay theatre company, TheatreofplucK, led by artistic director Niall Rea: the testimonial monologue D.R.A.[...]