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Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Fermeture exceptionnelle vendredi 27 mai et lundi 6 juin.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Fermeture exceptionnelle vendredi 27 mai et lundi 6 juin.

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Mots-clés

> CRITIQUE

CRITIQUE

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There's ropes and there's ropes

Article

Martin McDonagh's Hangmen (2015) is concerned with the moral question of justice. Set in a northern English pub run by a former hangman, the play's action takes place in 1965, on the day capital punishment is abolished in Britain. Combining (met[...]
Towards an Oceanic Dubliners

Article

Oceanic Studies sheds a compelling new light on James Joyce's Dubliners. Although they are citizens of a major imperial port city living amidst a global flow of goods, cultures, and ideas, Joyce's characters are n also impeded from reciprocal en[...]
An Absolutely Private Thing

Article

Kate O'Brien's 1941 The Land of Spices navigates spatial and emotional gaps through a series of letters that punctuate the narrative and offer evidence of the inner life of protagonist Helen Archer. Yet these letters also interrupt our reading e[...]
The Art of Writing

Article

Lecture delivered to Graduates' Association, 2nd May, 1963.
A City That She Must Postpone

Article

This essay explores the significance of the specific sites that dominate O'Brien's representations of self-development in her novels set in Paris. Building on the central position that critics allocate to Paris, this article asserts that O'Brien[...]
A Few Human Hearts in Catholic Breasts

Article

This article reads Kate O'Brien's Mary Lavelle in a cultural historical framework of medicine and psychoanalysis to explore the significance of the heart condition angina pectoris in the text. The novel illuminates the complexities of the mind-b[...]
Kate O'Brien in the Theatre

Article

Kate O'Brien initially made her literary reputation as a dramatist rather than a novelist. Her debut play Distinguished Villa (1926) won acclaim in London when first produced onstage, and critics compared her with Seán O'Casey. However, O'Brien'[...]
Kate O'Brien and Virginia Woolf

Article

Convergences in the work of Kate O'Brien and Virginia Woolf range from literary influences and political alignments, to a shared approach to narrative point of view, structure, or conceptual use of words. Common ground includes existentialist pr[...]
No Help to the Imagination

Article

Kate O'Brien's 1943 The Last of Summer has been read as the novelist's riposte to an insular island that stifled both her publishing (through censorship) and her imagination (through cultural conservatism). Set on the eve of the neutral ‘Emergen[...]
Spectacular Nostalgia

Article

This essay draws attention to how the avant-garde undertakings of Irish Revivalism, particularly those of the dramatic movement, influenced Kate O'Brien's writing in the wake of high modernism. Published in 1938, Pray for the Wanderer espouses a[...]
Help me please my hedge-school master

Article

This article traces Virgilian presences in Seamus Heaney's oeuvre, from Field Work (1979) to Human Chain (2010). Virgil appears under many guises in Heaney's poetry: in work published in the mid-1970s, he is a character from The Divine Comedy; b[...]
I cannot rub this strangeness from my sight

Article

Focussing on the poems in Sinéad Morrissey's Through the Square Window (2009), this essay examines how the poet envisions a transformed, post-troubles Belfast through a range of perspectives, shifting her attention away from but not entirely for[...]
In the dim light

Article

Beckett's Ill Seen Ill Said begins with the protagonist in a position where ‘she sees Venus rise followed by the sun.’ This opening indicates the direct relationship between the narrative and astronomical phenomena of Venus rising as the morning[...]
Let's wait and see

Article

This article discusses Beckett's and Friel's interest in waiting in the context of Jacques Derrida's notions of ‘messianism’ and the ‘messianic’. Beckett's Waiting for Godot and Friel's Freedom of the City and Wonderful Tennessee associate waiti[...]