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Carole Jacquet
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Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

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Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

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> CRITIQUE

CRITIQUE

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‘Comparative Liberty’: John Mitchel’s Jail Journal and Austin Reed’s The Life and the Adventures of a Haunted Convict

Article

In Jail Journal (1854), John Mitchel describes receiving a hero’s welcome on his arrival in Brooklyn as an escaped convict on 29 November 1853. That same day, Austin Reed was enjoying one of his rare periods of freedom from New York State penal [...]
Seamus Heaney’s Prisoners

Article

This article focuses on the role that prisoners play in the poems of Seamus Heaney. From the time of the introduction of internment in Northern Ireland in the early 1970s, Heaney’s poems frequently touch on prisoners, the conditions in which the[...]
Trinity Professors versus Men of Letters: Ferguson, Dowden and De Vere

Article

This essay considers the relationships between Samuel Ferguson, Edward Dowden, and Aubrey de Vere in the late nineteenth century. In evaluating Ferguson’s career shortly after the poet’s death in 1886, W. B. Yeats considered him as being ill-ser[...]
The Aesthetics of “the good-enough mother” in Lucy Caldwell’s Short Fiction

Article

It has been argued that “Troubles texts” tend to focus on identity formation, on violence and mimetic behaviour, on essentialist positions and on how they cause stasis and lack of emotion, while many short fiction writers have tried to deconstru[...]
‘All sorts of wonderful impossibilities’: Tracing the Genesis of John McGahern’s ‘Doorways’

Article

It is well known by now that John McGahern was a scrupulous reviser of his own work, even if this insight into his compositional methods has not been accompanied by a substantial body of research on the archive and the revisions themselves. This[...]
“Beidh ár dTigh Hughes féin againn”: Music, Dance, and Overcoming the Disorientation of COVID-19 in Meadhbh Ní Eadhra’s “Cuairteoirí”

Article

Cet article porte sur le symbolisme de la musique et de la danse dans la nouvelle de Meadhbh Ní Eadhra, « Cuairteoirí » [« Les visiteurs »], publiée dans le numéro d’octobre 2020 de la revue Comhar. Le cadre de la nouvelle est celui d’une maison[...]
The Changeling Legend and Queer Kinship in Caitriona Lally’s Eggshells

Article

In Caitriona Lally's debut novel Eggshells (2015), the narrator Vivian Lawlor is an adult woman with a quirky personality living in North Dublin, who believes herself to be a changeling. Throughout the novel, Vivian travels various paths in Dubl[...]
The Chinese Translation of Samuel Beckett: A Critical History

Article

In light of the relevant merits and defects of translation practice over sixty years, this article presents a critical history of the Chinese translation of the work of Samuel Beckett. The article argues that the history may be divided into two [...]
‘For “feather” read “father”’: Death and Possibility in Paul Muldoon’s Paternal Elegies

Article

Focused on Muldoon's father elegies written between his debut collection New Weather and Hay, the present essay argues that these poems evoke paternal death as the founding moment of poetic expression. Only when the father figure has passed away[...]
L’herméneutique biblique de John Lanigan, disciple irlandais de Pietro Tamburini

Article

L’article présente l’œuvre herméneutique de John Lanigan (1758-1825), d’abord disciple du janséniste italien Pietro Tamburini (1737-1827) au Collège irlandais de Rome, puis professeur d’Écritures saintes à Pavie. Chez les Anglo-Saxons, il est co[...]
‘I was listening … but did not succeed in hearing you’: Flann O’Brien, Ralph Cusack, and the Absurdities of Silent Musical Experience

Article

The notion of soundless music seems contradictory, even absurd: the concept of soundless musical experience less so. In this article, I explore two quite different descriptions of this kind of experience as set out in two mid-twentieth-century I[...]
Investing in Fictions: Faith, Abstraction and Materiality in Paul Murray’s The Mark and the Void

Article

One of the central contentions of this essay is that Paul Murray's novel, The Mark and the Void, addresses questions of faith, fictionality, literary form and the relationship between abstract finance and material sociality. The novel engages wi[...]
(Post)Dramatic Strategies: Performing Difference in Pat Kinevane’s Solo Theatre

Article

Pat Kinevane's solo performances focus on identities constituted on the margins of contemporary Irish society. Fusing the comic with the tragic, improvisation with carefully planned execution, and entertainment with serious cultural critique, th[...]
Dark Knowledge: Deirdre Madden’s One by One in the Darkness

Article

Deirdre Madden’s novel One by One in the Darkness, first published in 1996, marks its twenty-fifth anniversary in 2021. Madden began writing the book in 1993 in anticipation of another anniversary(a quarter century of political and sectaria[...]
‘A disoriented vision of...fact’: Brian Friel, Francis Bacon, and Faith Healer

Article

The Brian Friel Papers at the NLI reveal a long and relatively unexplored history of major and minor influences on Friel’s plays. As the archive attests, these influences manifest themselves in ways that range from the superficial to the deeply [...]
‘I am of Them’: Tom O’Flaherty’s Socialist Fictions and the Irish Free State

Article

Tom O’Flaherty’s unpublished novel Red Crom’s Island is a distinctly political potboiler that envisions the Gaeltacht as a potential centre for leftist revolutionary activity. By comparison, O’Flaherty’s two Anglophone short stories collection[...]
‘It was then I knew life’: Political Critique and Moral Debate in Teresa Deevy’s Temporal Powers(1932)

Article

This article argues that Teresa Deevy’s early plays for the Abbey Theatre deliberately intervened in the cultural politics of the Irish Free State. While the focus here is on Temporal Powers(1932), Deevy’s first twoAbbey productions, The Reape[...]
Quare Memory in Brendan Behan’s Borstal Boy

Article

This essay adapts David Cregan’s concept of‘queer memory’–a form of memory defined‘by exclusion rather than inclusion’–to the author of The Quare Fellow, analysing narrative gaps in Brendan Behan’s Borstal Boy in order to better understand its c[...]
W.B. Yeats the Choreographer: Composition in the Manuscripts of At the Hawk’s Well and The Only Jealousy of Emer

Article

This article investigates how William Butler Yeats’s interest in, and professional engagement with, modern dance affected the dramaturgical composition of his plays. Instead of focusing on individual dancers’contributions to the dance plays’ pre[...]
Are We Doing DiversityJustice? A Critical Exchange

Article

This critical exchange is based on a conversation between the authors which took place during the Irish University Review Roundtable Discussion: Displacing the Canon (2019 IASIL Conference, Trinity College Dublin). As authors we give first-h[...]
New Technologies of Research and Digital Interpretation for Early Modern Irish Studies

Article

This article outlines the vastly expanded ecosystem of digital projects and resources of use to researchers of early modern Ireland. It traces the evolution of objectives and practice from the earliest goal of making texts visible and accessible[...]
Oceans Apart: Amitav Ghosh, John Millington Synge,and Weak Comparison

Article

This article compares John Millington Synge’s The Aran Islands(1907) and Amitav Ghosh’s In An Antique Land(1992), travelogues, histories, and anthropological investigations of maritime societies. Both books tell of a world marked by s[...]
Reflecting Realities in Twenty-First-Century Irish Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Article

This article explores the evolution of Irish youth literature over the last four decades and these texts’engagement with cultural, political, and social transformations in Irish society. The adult desire to protect young people’s‘innocence’ from[...]
Brian Friel and Theodor W. Adorno

Article

For many philosophical thinkers since Thomas More's Utopia, the idea of a perfect human society has been aporetic – present in the imagination, yet beyond existent reality. The atrocities of the 20th century convinced the philosopher and musicol[...]
Choreographies of Place

Article

This essay explores the representation of public space in The Visitor and The Springs of Affection: Stories of Dublin by Maeve Brennan. In particular, it explores Brennan's representation of the negotiation of urban and suburban public space by [...]
Magic As Art in Lord Dunsany's The King of Elfland's Daughter

Article

In The King of Elfland's Daughter, Lord Dunsany crafts a fairy-story in which magic serves as an allegory for art. Elfland is a place of art, its timeless beauty created and sustained through magic; and its influence extends to the real world in[...]
Memory that owes nothing to fact

Article

Dancing at Lughnasa has been widely discussed as a memory play. Critics frequently analyze the way Michael's narration shapes the story he tells of five unmarried sisters living together in 1930's Donegal. Fewer critics, however, focus on Michae[...]
Scale, Deep Time, and the Politics of Representation in Derek Mahon's Life on Earth

Article

This essay reads Derek Mahon's 2008 collection, Life on Earth, in broadly ecocritical terms, arguing that the ecological concentrations of Mahon's recent work centre on the representational relationships between human and non-human ecologies; on[...]
There's ropes and there's ropes

Article

Martin McDonagh's Hangmen (2015) is concerned with the moral question of justice. Set in a northern English pub run by a former hangman, the play's action takes place in 1965, on the day capital punishment is abolished in Britain. Combining (met[...]
Towards an Oceanic Dubliners

Article

Oceanic Studies sheds a compelling new light on James Joyce's Dubliners. Although they are citizens of a major imperial port city living amidst a global flow of goods, cultures, and ideas, Joyce's characters are n also impeded from reciprocal en[...]
An Absolutely Private Thing

Article

Kate O'Brien's 1941 The Land of Spices navigates spatial and emotional gaps through a series of letters that punctuate the narrative and offer evidence of the inner life of protagonist Helen Archer. Yet these letters also interrupt our reading e[...]
The Art of Writing

Article

Lecture delivered to Graduates' Association, 2nd May, 1963.
A City That She Must Postpone

Article

This essay explores the significance of the specific sites that dominate O'Brien's representations of self-development in her novels set in Paris. Building on the central position that critics allocate to Paris, this article asserts that O'Brien[...]
A Few Human Hearts in Catholic Breasts

Article

This article reads Kate O'Brien's Mary Lavelle in a cultural historical framework of medicine and psychoanalysis to explore the significance of the heart condition angina pectoris in the text. The novel illuminates the complexities of the mind-b[...]
Kate O'Brien in the Theatre

Article

Kate O'Brien initially made her literary reputation as a dramatist rather than a novelist. Her debut play Distinguished Villa (1926) won acclaim in London when first produced onstage, and critics compared her with Seán O'Casey. However, O'Brien'[...]
Kate O'Brien and Virginia Woolf

Article

Convergences in the work of Kate O'Brien and Virginia Woolf range from literary influences and political alignments, to a shared approach to narrative point of view, structure, or conceptual use of words. Common ground includes existentialist pr[...]
No Help to the Imagination

Article

Kate O'Brien's 1943 The Last of Summer has been read as the novelist's riposte to an insular island that stifled both her publishing (through censorship) and her imagination (through cultural conservatism). Set on the eve of the neutral ‘Emergen[...]
Spectacular Nostalgia

Article

This essay draws attention to how the avant-garde undertakings of Irish Revivalism, particularly those of the dramatic movement, influenced Kate O'Brien's writing in the wake of high modernism. Published in 1938, Pray for the Wanderer espouses a[...]
Help me please my hedge-school master

Article

This article traces Virgilian presences in Seamus Heaney's oeuvre, from Field Work (1979) to Human Chain (2010). Virgil appears under many guises in Heaney's poetry: in work published in the mid-1970s, he is a character from The Divine Comedy; b[...]
I cannot rub this strangeness from my sight

Article

Focussing on the poems in Sinéad Morrissey's Through the Square Window (2009), this essay examines how the poet envisions a transformed, post-troubles Belfast through a range of perspectives, shifting her attention away from but not entirely for[...]
In the dim light

Article

Beckett's Ill Seen Ill Said begins with the protagonist in a position where ‘she sees Venus rise followed by the sun.’ This opening indicates the direct relationship between the narrative and astronomical phenomena of Venus rising as the morning[...]
Let's wait and see

Article

This article discusses Beckett's and Friel's interest in waiting in the context of Jacques Derrida's notions of ‘messianism’ and the ‘messianic’. Beckett's Waiting for Godot and Friel's Freedom of the City and Wonderful Tennessee associate waiti[...]
The Politics of Metaphor in Heaney's Sweeney Astray

Article

Seamus Heaney began translating the Middle Irish romance Buile Suibhne in 1972, but his ‘version from the Irish’, Sweeney Astray, wasn't published until 1983. This article explores Heaney's adaptation of metaphors from J.G. O'Keeffe's dual-langu[...]
The Pornographer and McGahern's Allusive Practice

Article

Allusions to other texts abound in John McGahern's fiction. His works repeatedly, though diffidently, refer to literary tradition. Yet the nature of such allusiveness is still unclear. This article focuses on how allusion in The Pornographer (19[...]
Responding to The Glass Shore

Article

In 2016, New Island Books published The Glass Shore, an anthology of short stories by women writers from the North of Ireland, edited by Sinéad Gleeson. To stage and share examples of the ‘reading dynamics’ enabled by this welcome anthology, I i[...]
Yeats's Kiogen

Article

W.B. Yeats intended The Cat and the Moon to be a Japanese ‘Kiogen’, a farce or comedy presented between two Noh plays or within a single Noh play. In the inner drama of The Cat and the Moon, miracles happen to both of the emblematic characters, [...]
Breaking Memory Modes

Article

Anne Enright's trauma novel, The Gathering (2007), and Tana French's crime novel, The Secret Place (2014), can be seen to operate purposefully within the familiar codes of their respective genres to a degree that draws attention to the processes[...]
The Third Walker

Article

A review of the two most recent collections by Billy Mills and Catherine Walsh: namely, "Imaginary Gardens" and "Astonished Birds/Cara, Jane, Bob and James", both published by hardPressed poetry in 2012. An attempt is made to describe how both a[...]
Deprovincializing Brian Friel's Drama in America, 2009 and 2014

Article

While American regional theatre has flourished for decades, hardly any critics with a national profile pay attention to it, but theatre critic Terry Teachout has recently argued that criticism must catch up with this ‘deprovincialized’ drama, dr[...]
Towards a Critical Reappraisal of Kate O'Brien's The Flower of May

Article

This essay reassesses Kate O'Brien's "The Flower of May", and argues that the novel presents as close to a conclusion as practicable to the themes O'Brien worked on throughout her fiction – the freedom to choose one's path in life, the negotiati[...]
Yeats, Vendler, and Byzantium

Article

Helen Vendler, in her magisterial "Our Secret Discipline: Yeats and Lyric Form" (2007), provides us with the tools with which to register the traditional formal elements of poetry, and she does so for the most part with her usual subtlety, clari[...]
Brendan at the Chelsea

Article

"Brendan at the Chelsea", which started life at the National Theatre Studio, was one of the first productions in the opening season at the newly rebuilt Lyric Theatre, Belfast in 2011. The Lyric production toured to New York, Belfast, Dublin, an[...]

Livre

Autobiographical essays, critical essays on poets and poetry (including Peter Fallon, Louis MacNeice, Michael Hartnett, Thomas Kinsella) and Seamus Heaney

Livre

Document du Fonds Adolphe Haberer, donation reçue en 2016. Consultation sur place, sur rendez-vous.
Frontiers of criticism

Article

L'oeuvre critique de Seamus Heaney offre plus qu'une simple grille de lecture de ses poèmes. Elle s'inscrit dans une démarche résolument dynamique qui témoigne d'une approche critique hors norme qui semble se jouer des modes et des courants. Cet[...]
Michael Dwyer

Article

The late film writer Michael Dwyer is justly celebrated for his championing of world cinema and, on the eve of the 64th Cannes Film Festival, David O Mahony remembers his careers and his relationship to this unique event
Spotlight

Article

Emmet O'Brien chats to Ian Palmer about his twelve-year journey into the world of Traveller bare-knuckle fighting
Transformer l'essai wildien

Article

Dans « The Critic as Artist », Wilde reconfigure radicalement le genre institutionnel de l'essai. Dramatisant sa réflexion au travers des deux personnages mis en scène, il élabore la notion d'un critique artiste. Cet Irlandais iconoclaste cherch[...]
Absolutely Critical

Article

The professional film reviewer is critical of film but are they critical to film ? David O Mahony talks to The Irish Times' Donald Clarke

Livre

John Wilson FOSTER, Auteur ; Edna LONGLEY, Préfacier, etc. | Dublin : Irish Academic Press | 2009
Table of contents
I.) Writers
1.Emblems of Diversity: Yeats and the Great War
2.The Islandman: The Teller and the Tale
3.Against Nature? Science and Oscar Wilde
4.The Weir: Inheriting the Wind
5.Stretching the Imagination[...]

Livre

Document du Fonds Adolphe Haberer, donation reçue en 2016. Consultation sur place, sur rendez-vous.

Livre

Document du Fonds Adolphe Haberer, donation reçue en 2016. Consultation sur place, sur rendez-vous.

Livre

Chapters: A Principia of Sorts - Reflections on Art and the Novel ; Long Larkin ; Nightspawn ; Brichwood ; Doctor Copernicus ; Kepler ; The Newton Letter ; Mefisto ; The Book of Evidence ; Ghosts ; Athena
The Redress of Poetry

Livre

Document du Fonds Adolphe Haberer, donation reçue en 2016. Consultation sur place, sur rendez-vous.
Reviews and Essays of Austin Clarke

Livre

Document du Fonds Adolphe Haberer, donation reçue en 2016. Consultation sur place, sur rendez-vous.

Livre

The French Joyce is the first book to trace the French critical reception of James Joyce's Work. Serious French interest in the Irish writer coincided with the rise of poststructuralism, and Geert Lernout pays particular attention to Joycean cri[...]