Centre Culturel Irlandais



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Centre Culturel Irlandais


 

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Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

Horaires d'ouverture

Du lundi au vendredi : 14h - 18h
Nocturne le mercredi jusqu'à 20h
Fermé week-end et jours fériés

Contacts

Carole Jacquet
Responsable des ressources documentaires

Marion Mossu
Chargée de ressources documentaires

Tel : 01 58 52 10 83 / 33

Où nous trouver ?

Tout près du Panthéon !
Centre Culturel Irlandais
5, rue des Irlandais - 75005 Paris

RER B : Luxembourg
Métros : M10 Cardinal Lemoine / M7 Place Monge
Bus : 84, 89, 21, 27

Carte

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A Few Human Hearts in Catholic Breasts

Article

This article reads Kate O'Brien's Mary Lavelle in a cultural historical framework of medicine and psychoanalysis to explore the significance of the heart condition angina pectoris in the text. The novel illuminates the complexities of the mind-b[...]
The Black Swan

Article

This essay views science as a creative mask for the poetry and philosophy of W.B. Yeats. It explores the changing worldview which occurred at the beginning of the twentieth century with the discovery of wave-particle duality by Max Planck in 190[...]
Buying And Selling Medical Books In Early Eighteenth-Century Dublin

Article

This article examines what was on the shelves of the medical marketplace in early eighteenth-century Dublin. It does so by analyzing the medical cohort in twenty-one auction and sales catalogues, printed in Dublin between 1695 and 1740. It explo[...]
The Entomological Imagination

Article

Insects are central to Thomas Kinsella's poetic ecologies. First, they highlight Kinsella's interest in process and change. Many of his volumes thematize circularity and cyclicality, growth and decay, and insects' short lives make these metamorp[...]
In the dim light

Article

Beckett's Ill Seen Ill Said begins with the protagonist in a position where ‘she sees Venus rise followed by the sun.’ This opening indicates the direct relationship between the narrative and astronomical phenomena of Venus rising as the morning[...]
Ciaran Carson and the Theory of Relativity

Article

Ciaran Carson’s poetry collection Until Before After (2010), written while Carson’s wife Deirdre was seriously ill, turns and returns to sickness and the spectre of death. However, it finds some relief from anxiety and grief in the interweaving [...]
Genomic Insights and the Irish Travellers

Article

Professor Gianpiero Cavalleri is Associate Professor of Human Genetics at Department of Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and is the lead author of a 2017 study into the genetic structure of the Iris[...]
Abnihilization of the Etym

Article

This essay examines one of Joyce's references to new physics in Finnegans Wake: the allusion to Ernest Rutherford in the opening section of the third chapter of Book II. The composition of Finnegans Wake coincided with the development of the the[...]
Yeats and the Mask of Science

Article

This paper views science through the prism of the Yeatsian mask, that is, as an appropriation of a willed creativity through the dynamics of opposition. It uses Jean-François Lyotard's philosophy of changing episteme in the twentieth century to [...]
Sir Isaac Newton's enlightened chronology and inter-denominational discourse in eighteenth-century Ireland

Article

When one thinks of Newton, Ireland in unlikely to figure in any account of his existence or output, nor did he publish any writings on Ireland. His private letters reveals little consideration of the sister kingdom. In terms of association, his [...]
Making hay when the sun don't shine

Article

Rev. William Richardson (1740-1820) claimed the grass known by the old Irish name of fiorin could produce abundant winter hay and help reclaim bogland. In 1806 the leading British scientist Humphry Davy visited Richardson and was impressed enoug[...]